my life in scrubs...

peacelove-yoga:

Keep Calm and Carry Om
Aug 13

peacelove-yoga:

Keep Calm and Carry Om

myjourneytobethebestme:

Couldn’t have said it better myself
Aug 13

myjourneytobethebestme:

Couldn’t have said it better myself

(Source: )

begikodienorastis:

 I want to feel this way…again
Aug 12

begikodienorastis:

 I want to feel this way…again

(Source: pokec0re, via begikodienorastis-deactivated20)

Aug 12

(via begikodienorastis-deactivated20)

intobetterdays:

So much win!
Aug 12

intobetterdays:

So much win!

(Source: thefitmiss, via begikodienorastis-deactivated20)

my days of orientation and being precepted are coming to an end. slightly scary to say the least. i can not believe i will be on my own in essentially one month. insane how fast 12 weeks flew by. i have learnt, seen, experienced, became more self aware, became slightly more cynical, so much more appreciative about life in general. i love what i do to the ninth degree, but i have never worked in an atmosphere where every moment you are going through a 101 emotions. i have had days where all i want to do is curl up and hide under the desk, and just pretend the day away, and i have had days where i feel amazing, and that i know what im doing i will be fine on my own, and sometimes it is even the same shift. i am learning a lot about myself as a person and as a nurse. i am coming to terms about dealing with abuse cases where the family is filled with guilt and wont let the baby go, when it is obviously time. i am dealing with families who dont come to visit their 1 mos old, or the ones who stay at the bedside 24/7 and want to discuss everything minuet detail of what you are doing, the a&p of whats going on, and even seeking medical advice for themselves. i love the chaos that is the picu, and how i can have an assignment that is supposed to be cake, and turns into something so much more. i love how attached i get to the little ones, and how each kid, whether they are a 12 yo diabetic who has a smart mouth, to the 1 month-er who was born 5 weeks early, who is such a sweet little peanut; makes their mark on me and makes me a better nurse for taking care of them. i am learning how to stop over-analyzing everything i do, and have yet to pass out at the bedside. i love getting to know the families whether they are here for a day or months. i love the incredible staff i work with, who all assure me that orientation is the worse, and it gets better from there, and when i am crying my eyes out on the way home, its nice to know that i am not alone feeling like i am a complete failure and disappointment, because that also comes with the wonderful world of orientation.

at this stage of the game i am eager to be on my own; at least for one moment, and then completely terrified of not remembering anything. i have learnt so much more from being on the unit and experiencing things first had that i never had the chance to do in lab or clinicals. i have drawn more blood gases than i ever thought was possible and am understanding more and more what i am looking at and when i should be alarmed. i am growing my assessment skills and slowly learning when to be alarmed and when it is just gas. i surprised myself by loving the chronic kids, whose parents know so much and more about every little detail about their condition and are such a wealth of knowledge. i love the teaching rounds that happen in the morning, and have learnt so much from the attendings and residents. not going to lie, totally makes me smile when i know an answer and they dont. nurses are totally smarter than docs. (jk) (mostly).

time for bed, and prob enough rambling for the night.

Jul 15
4 weeks to go and so much to learn…

"You know you are a pediatric nurse when: Stains on your scrubs in hues of white, off white, yellow, seedy yellow, and of course, various shades of brown brightly adorn your scrubs. And subsequently, you have mastered the creation of the perfect stain remover substance that works best on partially digested formula-based stains. Your locker is also stocked with a spare pink, teal, and Disney Princess scrub top in case of a stain emergency. Your friends who are new parents turn to you for advice on diaper changing skills since you get more practice changing diapers on a daily basis than most parents do with their own kids. You don’t memorize medicine dosages by mg or mcg but instead by weight-based dosing such as mg/kg or mcg/kg. It’s a normal occurrence to see the fairy godmother frolicking through the halls of the hospital. You think an eight pound baby is one of the biggest, healthiest looking babies you have ever seen! You impress your fellow adult health nurses because you can do weight-based dosing calculations in your head without the use of a calculator. People look at you funny when you check the pulse integrity and capillary refill on each new child that you meet, just by habit. You have mastered the art of making saline syringes into water guns, blue gloves into inflatable chickens, and tourniquets into the best sling-shots ever seen. You look forward to seeing clowns at work. Wagons are a hotter commodity to come across than a wheelchair at your hospital. You have memorized the channel numbers for Cartoon Network, Disney Channel and PBS kids. Lidocaine cream is your very best friend. When it snows, your patient population is almost as excited about eating the snow as they are playing in it. Until your eyes adjust, you almost need sunglasses when you first get to work to help shade some of the bright colors that bounce off the walls decorating your floor. Your patients don’t sleep at night- instead they demand to eat all night long! Diapers harbor multiple functions including using them as a boxing glove to wrap up IVs so they don’t get pulled out. The art of distraction is the best pre-med you have found. You have mastered the art of holding a baby in one arm while changing a bed with the other. Your downtime is spent loving on babies whose parents aren’t at the bedside. Sometimes multiple patients can be found nestled in the arms of nurses behind the desk. You can swaddle a baby and have them asleep in 2.5 seconds. Even your strapping attending physician speaks in higher child-like tones when speaking to his patients. Your favorite part of the day is seeing a mother dress her baby in his “home from the hospital outfit,” free of wires, tubes and drains, and take him home for the very first time. Your refrigerator looks like a preschool art class exploded on it. You know you are a pediatric nurse when you get excited each day that you come to work because you get to experience one of the most endearing, resilient, and beautiful patient populations."

Jul 15

"You might be a nurse if… You can drink a pot of coffee and still go to sleep in the morning. *You believe every patient needs TLC: Thorazine, Lorazapam, and Compazine. *You can’t see it; it’s probably not there. *Your sense of humor seems to get more warped each year. *You think it is acceptable to use “penis” and “vagina” in a normal conversation. *You believe the definition of stress is when you wake up screaming and you realize you haven’t fallen asleep yet. *You believe that if warm wine enemas were routinely ordered, patient complaints would greatly decrease. *You call some of your co-workers “Flowers in the Field of Medicine” because they’re bloomin’ idiots. *You hope there’s a special place in Hell for the inventor of the call light. *You believe not all patients are annoying. Some are dead. *You believe experience is something you don’t get until just after you need it. *You see stress as a normal way of life. *You have a tendency to laugh at your patient’s “big” problems. *You know the phone numbers of every late night food delivery place in town by heart. *You believe the problem with the gene pool is that there is no lifeguard. *You’ve ever thought, “Patients, God love ‘em, because today, I sure don’t!” *Everything only happens all at once. *You have more T-shirts that say, “Love a nurse PRN” than plain T-shirts. *You’ve ever referred to other nurses as “Band-Aid Bunnies.” *You’ve ever been telling work stories in a restaurant and had someone at another table throw-up. *You write a patient report and have to translate it to medical records because of all the acronyms in it. *You notice that you use more four-letter words now than before you became a nurse. *You look in your closet and can’t find anything non-medical to wear. *You’ve ever told anyone in pain to “stop being a baby and deal with it.” *You have a patient in four-point leathers that asks if you’re a nurse, you reply “Yes”, and walk away. *You’ve ever told a patient to “stop faking it.” *You believe all bleeding stops…eventually. *You don’t get excited about blood loss unless it’s your own. *You don’t hit patients or doctors….unless absolutely necessary. *You believe the pain will go away when it stops hurting. *Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong and if nothing has gone wrong, you’ve obviously don’t understand the situation. *You believe if you can keep your head among all this confusion, you obviously don’t understand the situation. *You’ve ever said, “Why am I here?” *If you believe if a patient who has a catheter, he needs it. *Everyone gets treated exactly the same…until they piss you off. *When you get a call telling you the name of your next admit and you can do the care plan before the patient gets to the floor. *When called for orders, the MD says, “Write them yourself; you know the patient better than I do.” *You’ve ever had to contend with someone who thinks constipation for 4 hours is an emergency. *Ever rolled your eyes when the 14 year-old says, “No, I’ve never had sex.” *You refer to motorcyclists as organ donors. *You can eat a candy bar with one hand while performing digital stimulation on your patient with the other hand, and it doesn’t bother you. *You believe Tylenol, Advil, or Excedrin provides a large part of your daily calorie intake requirements. *You’ve ever held a 14-gauge needle over someone’s vein and said, “Now your going to feel a little stick.” *You can identify the “PID Shuffle” and the “Kidney Stone Squirm” at 15 feet. *You’ve ever had a patient with a nose ring, a brow ring and twelve earrings say, “I’m afraid of shots.” *You’ve ever thought, “As long as he’s got a pulse, I don’t care about the rhythm.” *You think the ultimate cruel joke is get someone drunk, take them to the ER and tell them he OD’d on “some kind of pills.” *You automatically multiply by three the number of drinks a patient claims to have daily. *You can keep a straight face when a patient responds, “Just two beers.” *You feel that if someone is shot or stabbed, they probably deserved it. *You stare at someone in utter disbelief when they actually cover their mouth to cough. *You think “awake and stupid” is an appropriate choice for mental status. *You believe in the aerial spraying of Prozac. *You have encouraged obnoxious patients to sign out AMA. *You believe the government should require a permit to reproduce. *Your most common assessment question at 2 a.m. is “Why is this an emergency now?” *You believe every waiting room should have a Valium salt lick. *You don’t believe 90% of what you’re told, and 75% of what you see. *You firmly believe that “too stupid to live” should be a diagnosis. *You have to leave the patient before you begin to laugh uncontrollably. *You believe a book entitled “Suicide: Getting it Right the First Time” will be your next project. *You believe a good tape job will fix anything. *You’ve ever had a patient look you dead in the eye and say, “I don’t know how that got stuck in there.” *You have ever had a patient say, “I’m not pregnant, I can’t be pregnant! I can’t be having a baby!” *You have a special shrine in your home to the inventor of Haldol."

Jul 9

I guess today is my last day of my 6th week of being on the floor. Insane. I did nights this week and wasn’t a fan. Def not a night person but love the staff and the pace. It’s so completely different from day shift you would think it was a different floor or hospital. The only thing that scares me more than being alone in 5 weeks is the new residents. Some seem great but it’s way scary for them to be asking my opinion about plan of treatment or concentrations of Meds. I’m excited about being on my own and making my own schedule and learning to manage my time to fit my day. But I’m scared shitless. You are in school and are supervised by a clinical instructor and other nurses. You graduate and have a preceptor for 12 weeks. Then wham you are on your own. No one to hold your hand or remind you about what you may have missed. You are there to catch your own mistakes. It’s quite frightening. But I guess we all go through this aspect of learning to leave the nest and how to fly on our own. I have has the most incredible first half. I feel like I learnt nothing in nursing school and then things will come back to me an the little instincts I have will kick in. Its so amazing to be able to “fix” a child who didn’t look like they would survive the night let alone leave the hospital. It is incredible to hold a 3kg baby and take care of it knowing even though she may not remember you, she will have touched a part of you and you value life that much more. I dont think I would have survive my first week let alone 6 without the incredible group of nurses and physicians. I have learned so much and seen so much. I have even taught a new resident how to put in a foley in an infant. Everything about this place screams I want to be the best and be about the patients. It’s not about only taking the interesting cases that will make the hospital look good, Its about the cases no one else will touch. It’s amazing. I love my job.

Jul 9
Half way there and no idea where time went….

"In three words I can sum up everything I’ve learned about life. It goes on. ~Robert Frost"

Jun 25